Emanuel REINHARD

Male 1847 - 1928  (80 years)


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  • Name Emanuel REINHARD 
    Born 1 Sep 1847  Cetronia, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 6 Feb 1928  Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Obituary 7 Feb 1928  The Morning Call, Allentown, PA, pages 5 & 19 Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Emanuel W. Reinhard, commander of E. B. Young Post No. 87, G.A.R., veteran construction engineer and one of the city's grand old men, died last night at his home, 905 Allen street. He was in his eighty-first year. His death came suddenly after an illness of only four weeks, to the day, during which he, himself, regarded his afflictions as only temporary. He died, surrounded by members of his family, calmly and peacefully and in full possession of all of his faculties. Few men of Allentown have lived a more quiet and industrious life and at the same time have been so well known and universally respected than Emanuel Reinhard, and his death last night brought genuine grief not only to members of his large family, but to his legion of friends, fellow war veterans, employers and co-workers. For sixty years Mr. Reinhard was known in these parts as one of the best authorities in construction engineering and there are still many large buildings in Allentown that were erected under his personal supervision. During the past thirty years he was in charge of all construction for the Arbogast and Bastian company, and as late as January 6, was actively on the job. Prior to that time he was connected with William H. Gangewere Construction company. Mr. Reinhard's last appearance in public was on January 7, the day before he was forced to take to his bed, when he was installed as commander of E. B. Young Post for the third successive year. He had long been an active member of the post and always regarded the association with fellow veterans as one of the great pleasures of his life. As one of the organizers and charter members of Livingston Castle and St. Mary's Commandery, Knights of the Golden Eagle, he also achieved a record of distinction, and during his younger years, was drill master in the commandery. The Sons of Veterans and the Ladies' Relief Corps of the G.A.R. likewise considered themselves fortunate in listing him as a prominent member. On August 18, 1864, the age of seventeen, he enlisted as a private in Captain Roth's company E., 202nd Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was discharged on August 3, 1865, after an active year of service during which he distinguished himself for his bravery and resourcefulness. The regiment had a hazardous campaign and was engaged almost daily in combating Col. Mosby's guerillas along the Orange and Alexander road in Virginia. The storming of Fort Stetman as well as the hotly contested of the skirmish battles, Mr. Reinhard was wounded and the effects of the hurt followed him during his entire life. A giant in stature and physically as strong as iron, he always commanded respectful attention among men. But, in contrast to his physique, he was mild-mannered, soft spoken and considerate of his fellow. Despite his advanced age, his faculties were keen, his eyesight excellent and his iron nerve unaffected by the rigors of a long life-time. At the age of eighty, he astonished builders by walking intrepidly across girders and beams on buildings whose construction he was supervising, climbing ladders and performing other feats usually reserved for younger men. Of him it was said that he was one of the few builders who could read and grasp the smallest details of a blue-print at a glance, and his advice was often sought by other engineers. And of him it was often said by those who marveled at his activity: "Emanuel Reinhard will never die." He, himself, frequently predicted that he would "die in the harness." Dr. Robert L. Schaffer, his physician, was quoted as saying repeatedly during his last illness: "During all my practice, I have never seen such stamina and resistance." Mr. Reinhard stood over six feet in height and weighed over 200 pounds. Politically he was a staunch Republican and some years ago was intimately associated with Walter L. Jones, for more than a quarter of a century Republican leader of Lehigh county. During the administration of Mayor E. B. Young, 1876-78, Allentown's fifth mayor, Mr. Reinhard served for a while as a policeman, but later returned to his building activities. Mr. Reinhard's religious activities for many years were centered in and about Seibert U. E. church, whose edifice he helped to build. He was one of the congregation's charter members and at one time a trustee. In 1867 he was married to Amanda C. Kutz, who survives him. They were planning to celebrate their sixty-first wedding anniversary on April 25 of this year. Five children were born to the union, four of them surviving. They are: Mrs. Augustus Yoachum, Bethlehem; Mrs. Charles W. Snyder, Allentown; Mrs. Mabel Diehl, who lived at the Reinhard residence; and Clarence H. Reinhard, also of this city. Fifteen grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren also survive. Mr. Reinhard was born in 1847 at Cetronia, South Whitehall township, a son of the late Jonathan and Rebekah, nee Wisser, Reinhard., and the youngest of eleven children, all of whom preceded him in death. He moved to Allentown shortly after the close of the Civil war. Funeral arrangements had not been completed last night.
    [The Morning Call, Allentown, PA, Tuesday, February 7, 1928, pages 5 & 19] 
    Person ID I199  Wisser and Bryant 2013 | Dale Wisser family
    Last Modified 20 Feb 2017 

    Father Jonathan REINHARD 
    Mother Rebecca WISSER,   b. About 1802,   d. About 1841  (Age ~ 39 years) 
    Family ID F344  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1 Sep 1847 - Cetronia, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 6 Feb 1928 - Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsObituary - Emanuel W. Reinhard, commander of E. B. Young Post No. 87, G.A.R., veteran construction engineer and one of the city's grand old men, died last night at his home, 905 Allen street. He was in his eighty-first year. His death came suddenly after an illness of only four weeks, to the day, during which he, himself, regarded his afflictions as only temporary. He died, surrounded by members of his family, calmly and peacefully and in full possession of all of his faculties. Few men of Allentown have lived a more quiet and industrious life and at the same time have been so well known and universally respected than Emanuel Reinhard, and his death last night brought genuine grief not only to members of his large family, but to his legion of friends, fellow war veterans, employers and co-workers. For sixty years Mr. Reinhard was known in these parts as one of the best authorities in construction engineering and there are still many large buildings in Allentown that were erected under his personal supervision. During the past thirty years he was in charge of all construction for the Arbogast and Bastian company, and as late as January 6, was actively on the job. Prior to that time he was connected with William H. Gangewere Construction company. Mr. Reinhard's last appearance in public was on January 7, the day before he was forced to take to his bed, when he was installed as commander of E. B. Young Post for the third successive year. He had long been an active member of the post and always regarded the association with fellow veterans as one of the great pleasures of his life. As one of the organizers and charter members of Livingston Castle and St. Mary's Commandery, Knights of the Golden Eagle, he also achieved a record of distinction, and during his younger years, was drill master in the commandery. The Sons of Veterans and the Ladies' Relief Corps of the G.A.R. likewise considered themselves fortunate in listing him as a prominent member. On August 18, 1864, the age of seventeen, he enlisted as a private in Captain Roth's company E., 202nd Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was discharged on August 3, 1865, after an active year of service during which he distinguished himself for his bravery and resourcefulness. The regiment had a hazardous campaign and was engaged almost daily in combating Col. Mosby's guerillas along the Orange and Alexander road in Virginia. The storming of Fort Stetman as well as the hotly contested of the skirmish battles, Mr. Reinhard was wounded and the effects of the hurt followed him during his entire life. A giant in stature and physically as strong as iron, he always commanded respectful attention among men. But, in contrast to his physique, he was mild-mannered, soft spoken and considerate of his fellow. Despite his advanced age, his faculties were keen, his eyesight excellent and his iron nerve unaffected by the rigors of a long life-time. At the age of eighty, he astonished builders by walking intrepidly across girders and beams on buildings whose construction he was supervising, climbing ladders and performing other feats usually reserved for younger men. Of him it was said that he was one of the few builders who could read and grasp the smallest details of a blue-print at a glance, and his advice was often sought by other engineers. And of him it was often said by those who marveled at his activity: "Emanuel Reinhard will never die." He, himself, frequently predicted that he would "die in the harness." Dr. Robert L. Schaffer, his physician, was quoted as saying repeatedly during his last illness: "During all my practice, I have never seen such stamina and resistance." Mr. Reinhard stood over six feet in height and weighed over 200 pounds. Politically he was a staunch Republican and some years ago was intimately associated with Walter L. Jones, for more than a quarter of a century Republican leader of Lehigh county. During the administration of Mayor E. B. Young, 1876-78, Allentown's fifth mayor, Mr. Reinhard served for a while as a policeman, but later returned to his building activities. Mr. Reinhard's religious activities for many years were centered in and about Seibert U. E. church, whose edifice he helped to build. He was one of the congregation's charter members and at one time a trustee. In 1867 he was married to Amanda C. Kutz, who survives him. They were planning to celebrate their sixty-first wedding anniversary on April 25 of this year. Five children were born to the union, four of them surviving. They are: Mrs. Augustus Yoachum, Bethlehem; Mrs. Charles W. Snyder, Allentown; Mrs. Mabel Diehl, who lived at the Reinhard residence; and Clarence H. Reinhard, also of this city. Fifteen grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren also survive. Mr. Reinhard was born in 1847 at Cetronia, South Whitehall township, a son of the late Jonathan and Rebekah, nee Wisser, Reinhard., and the youngest of eleven children, all of whom preceded him in death. He moved to Allentown shortly after the close of the Civil war. Funeral arrangements had not been completed last night. [The Morning Call, Allentown, PA, Tuesday, February 7, 1928, pages 5 & 19] - 7 Feb 1928 - The Morning Call, Allentown, PA, pages 5 & 19 Link to Google Earth
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